no resits this year…

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So I passed all my exams. The relief of not having the summer spoiled by looming resits is wonderful.

We played a gig in the lovely Spirit Store in Dundalk last night, so a big thank you to the wonderful crowd who turned up and bought CDs and bopped around. The comedy value was high and I think Gentry has sold enough cds to pay his clamping fine 100 times over. One of the Tuesday Night men, Peter, turned up, a little blast from the past, so it was great to see him.

And Ok, Ok, no more nurofen…the shoulder is a bit better now, Aidan did his thing yesterday and I will check out the anti-inflammatory foods Steve. Thats another thing I feel a bit guilty about, living on chicken burgers over the last few weeks. Oh well.

Reviews for “People Have Names”

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Belfast Telegraph
JULIET TURNER: People Have Names
(Hear This) 4 Stars ****

You’d be hard pushed to find a flaw in Juliet Turner’s musical armoury.
The Omagh-born songstress has usually delivered in both recording studio and stage. She‚Äôs a natural at encapsulating a marriage between folk and the singer-songwriter genre. “Season of the Hurricane” from 2004 was an excellent body of work ‚Äî but since then she‚Äôs swapped the studio for the lecture hall and gone back to Trinity College Dublin to do a four-year degree in speech and language therapy.
Fast forward to 2008 and Turner has just made the album of her life.
People Have Names is a quite stunning collection of material — gorgeously presented by simple, sumptuous arrangements that are underpinned by Turner’s delicate vocal chords. The single Trickster is among the many highlights, but the two outstanding tracks are High Hopes and the opener Invisible to the Eye.

HotPress Music Magazine ****
Irish Maverick is Album of the Year Contender.

Whereas many of her contemporaries have lost momentum, their best work behind them, Juliet Turner’s fourth studio album is an intoxicating example of an adventurous artist moving forward, discovering fresh topics, literate themes and intriguing sounds with which to tease her artistic muse. “Invisible to the Eye” is a striking song with Turner’s voice at its most sublime. The Cohenish “High Hopes” looks at the vicissitudes of love, “Elder of the Tribe” focuses on contrasting generational differences, while the unsettling, country-tinged “Tuesday Night Ladies” – boasting a particularly exquisite vocal from Turner – is a graphic depiction of modern lives lived with no direction home. Despite the slow tempo, “Joy” is uplifting and brash, with a self-confident sweet swagger, but “Trickster” is the real gem, a deceptively catchy tune with the refrain “What do you mean you don’t like shopping? What do you mean you don’t watch TV?”.

Keith Lawless’s production, drizzled with warm strings and splashes of accordian and brass, brings a seductive and uncluttered feel to a bunch of songs that Turner seems to have been tenderly nurturing for a while. “People Have Names” is about as faultless as it gets and is a serious contender for album of the year. (Jackie Hayden)

Sunday 22 June: Sunday Life – JULIET TURNER – People Have Names (Hear This!):
Turner has quietly evolved into one of our best singer/songwriters, and this fourth album, with a rich production and an increasingly sophisticated musical palette, may just be her best yet. Its songs are personal snapshots that reflect on the hard, bitter truths of life and are suffused with an air of sadness and regret that chime perfectly with the melancholy edge to Turner’s voice.


Irish Times four stars. ****.

“Just as Juliet Turner’s palate for life’s sweet and salty moments has evolved, so her palette of sound has rumbled onwards as well, and her appreciation for life’s minor chords has grown. The title track (left to the end of the album, where it can seep into the subconscious) is a thought provoking meditation on life’s defining qualities: “It’s the work of a life time to love and be loved in return, to love to the end”. Lyrically, Turner’s attention turns to the big and small ticket stories; loneliness (Tuesday Night Ladies), romance (High Hopes) and the contradictions of youth and age (The Elder of the Tribe). Arrangements are spacious and unforced, with suitably tinted brass and strings, and Turner’s wisdom in letting her cds percolate for olympian periods is palpable on this gloriously taut collection”. (Sinead Long)

Radio Foyle/ Mark Patterson

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I’m going up to Derry on Friday afternoon to Radio Foyle, where I’ll be playing a couple of live tracks and chatting with Mark Patterson around 3.45 p.m. before the An Creggan and Sandino’s shows. Mark is an old friend and once tried to drown me off the coast of Donegal, so it will be nice to see him again.

Ray Darcy Show

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Gentry Morris, Kathleen Turner and myself are getting ready this afternoon to travel down to Cork to play on the Ray Darcy radio show tomorrow morning. It’s like a mini break, we’re staying in a beautiful hotel in Cork and doing a disco funk cover, which is very exciting. I have also heard rumours of Ray posing naked for a photographer at sunrise, which is, in itself, worth travelling to Cork for. So tune in guys, shame it’s radio and not tv, but there may be a web cam. Today FM, tomorrow morning, you’ll be a fool to miss it. Gentry is also weirdly excited about the train journey, he thinks it will be like the Hogwarts Express and I haven’t the courage or the heart to disillusion him.

We have been having some great gigs, The Empire in Belfast was great fun, enhanced by the bottle of pink champagne left on the stage and the flowers in the dressing room (thanks King Om and Eddie), Dolans Warehouse was a riot and we had a beautiful gig in the Roisin Dubh in Galway last night as part of the Galway Sessions Festival. People seem to be loving the new album and Gentry has been going down a storm.

I’m really looking forward to the Whelans gig as well, Keith Lawless and Dave Lawless will be joining myself and Brian Grace in the band that evening and there are a few other special guests coming along for the last song of the evening which should be memorable. Try not to miss it and if you can’t come yourself, send ten friends in your place.

Gentry Morris

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I’m delighted that Gentry Morris, who has recently moved over from Nashville to live in Ireland, is going to be my guest on the forthcoming Irish tour. His music is gorgeous and you can have a listen here. Better still, come along to the gigs and have a listen.

“Trickster”

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If anyone is interested in the story behind “Trickster”, click here

Also, you could google the Dublin Improv Society and have a read of Lewis Hyde’s book “Trickster”.

A nice review of the new album in the Irish Times this morning, four stars. ****.

“Just as Juliet Turner’s palate for life’s salty and salty moments has evolved, so her palette of sound has rumbled onwards as well, and her appreciation for life’s minor chords has grown. The title track (left to the end of the album, where it can seep into the subconscious) is a thought provoking meditation on life’s defining qualities: “It’s the work of a life time to love and be loved in return, to love to the end”. Lyrically, Turner’s attention turns to the big and small ticket stories; loneliness (Tuesday Night Ladies), romance (High Hopes) and the contradictions of youth and age (The Elder of the Tribe). Arrangements are spacious and unforced, with suitably tinted brass and strings, and Turner’s wisdom in letting her cds percolate for olympian periods is palpable on this gloriously taut collection”.

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